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Tuesday, 3 April 2012

C is for: Cocorico or Cock-a-doodle-doo?


                    (today’s rooster on yesterday’s fence post)

I would really like to know what the guy was smoking when he translated the sound of the rooster from French to English.  Now, here I go, assuming that the rooster came in French first, and that would be totally wrong because the rooster came from the egg.  AhAh!
                                                  
Yes, I am aware that accents make words sound different but give me a break, this one does not make sense!   I’m told that in Dutch it’s Kukeleku, in Turkish: Kukuriku,  and in German,  Kikeriki.  In Spanish: Quiquirikiiiiiiiii and in Egyptian Arabic, it's كوكوكوكو (kukukuuku)
                                                     
I know what I’m going to say from now on when I talk to Rusty Rooster….  Have you made up your mind?  Well, I don’t know about you but I feel a song coming on…

♪♫♪ One of these words doesn't sound like the others♫♪♫
♫♪♫ One of these words just doesn’t belong♪♫♪
♪♫♪ Can you tell me which word doesn't sound like the others♫♪♫
♫♪♫ By the time I finish my song? ♪♫♪

Signing off:  or better yet, before the rooster crows and we have to start all over again!


 Better be a Little “S” than a  Little Less 
                                                                                       

18 comments:

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    1. Thank you Karen:) enjoy your reading! Sylvie

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    1. Thank you Pam! I appreciate your taking the time to come and say hello! I will reciprocate. Cheers, Sylvie

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  3. I guess the english rooster's song was decided by a poet! :)

    Can't wait to have hens again, and now that I get up before dawn, I can have a rooster and go wake HIM up with a nice COCORICO at 4h45 am! ;)

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    1. Please make a video of that, will you? I can just imagine you sneaking up on the rooster... I was just thinking, if you scare him to death, you should plan it on a day that you have a good recipe handy for coq-au-vin!! :-o. xxxxxxxx S

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  4. Very interesting. :) I often think of animal noises and wonder why we say them the way we do in English. I mean, what dog goes "bow wow"? If anything, it's kind of a "ruff" or an "arf", but I haven't yet seen the day that a dog clearly enunciates the words "bow wow." ;)

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    1. I' m with you Shelley; i live with 2 dogs and other than singing Happy Birthday with me, they have never uttered a ruff-ruff, arf-arf or bow-wow! I know they're telling me something but i just can' t decipher it . I'll keep trying. Sylvie

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  5. The last time I heard a rooster, it sounded more like a sore throat on the run than anything else in french, english or any language I know of!
    The reference to the sound of a dog is a good one! How did someone decide that and turned it into a rule?!?!
    And why does a cow moo in english and meuh in french?
    Good post again!!!

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  6. Thank you bro! I figure cock-a-doodle-doo must have rhymed with some other word we can't think of and that's how it got created! Can't wait to see your "C" blog! xxxxxxxS

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  7. Aha...this reminded me of the good guy with whom we stayed in Flessels.

    He said his Cock always went off in the morning with a cock a doodle doo and not cocorico, so he was sure it is an English cock.
    (I had written a complete post about him last Aug.

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  8. Super fun! I always wondered about that in my beginning Spanish class. Too funny.
    But most creative chicken imitations and sounds were on the show Arrested Development! Hands down.

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  9. Fun post...now how to blend one of these pronunciations into conversation? Which came first - the rooster or the egg? Nice to meet up on the A to Z!

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  10. All I can say is, with 2 boys, 13 and 16, "Cock-a-doodle-do" can't be said without a whole lot of snickering.

    Stopping in via the A-Z blogging challenge.

    Bev @ Blue Velvet Vincent

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  11. Love this! I had a gooood chuckle!

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  12. Absolutely in agreement. The american moo doesn't do much for me either.

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  13. I had never done the research in other languages and I loved your idea!
    French is definitely closest to all other languages... the english guy who found the sound for the rooster probably was an aristocrat... sounds so fancy!! ;)

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